Macaroni and Cute

Bunny Macaroni Cheese

In an odd confluence of influences, I ended up with a box of bunny macaroni and cheese. Just the other day, discussions were had about the lack of KraftTM©® Dinner that I have experienced. Anyone who knows me at all knows that rabbity things keep showing up around me. Clearly, when I walked past a box of macaroni and cheese, except bunnies, I was going to buy it.

Push the bunnies tail! Push it!Bunny Approves!Bunny Macaroni Cheese

It really did come in a very cute box (:

Although, I gotta be honest, it tasted about as good as pasta-cheese from a box can aspire to.

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Pumpkin Soup

Soup+Bacon

It’s cold! And I don’t like it.

I made soup, yesterday! It’s marvellous. Tonight, I had it was bacon instead of toast (and added a splash of cream). I highly recommend it. Anywho, a recipe!

I did a pile of chopping, then a pile of cooking. I’m pretty sure the two can overlap; but not entirely.

I had 1 leek, 1 bulb of fennel, and three red onions chopped into slices; 1 red capsicum diced relatively finely; half of a pumpkin chopped into 1-2″ chunks*; about 8 medium-small potatoes, quartered and a half dozen slices of bacon roughly chopped up.

Bacon goes into a pot first, and is cooked until browned; then the capsicum is added and cooked until it softens up; then the leek/fennel/red onions join in. Once those have cooked down (uh, they 2/3 filled the pot when I added them, and when they were down to about 1/3 I continued onwards..); add the pumpkin and potatoes, and add enough water to just cover the potatoes/pumpkin.

Cook it until the potatoes and pumpkin are cooked; then point a stick blender at it until it’s smoooothish.

Yuhm.

*I peeled the first half of the pumpkin with much suffering; and cut the other half into chunks and roasted it in a 200°C oven until the pumpkin was just starting to soften up. It made the skin vastly easier to get off; and probably helped make the soup tastier. Next time, I’d roast all of the pumpkin to avoid the pumpkin peeling.

Smoked Salmon is Delicious

First, make a delicious cure: 1/3c of flakey salt, 2 tablespoons of sugar, the finely grated zest of a lemon, lime and an orange (optionally, half a grapefruit as well) and a bit of white pepper are combined together. The zest has enough moisture to sorta damped the sugar and salt. Next, take a piece of salmon fillet, and press the cure mixture on to the non-skin side. Gaps are okay (: Don’t panic if there are gaps.

Wrap the salmon in a sheet of tinfoil, then put it in a dish in the fridge (You want the dish because a bunch of liquid will be pulled from the salmon, and while foil usually does an admirable job of containing the liquid; it’s better to avoid having it dribble through your fridge if it doesn’t (: ). Leave the salmon for 2-3 hours.

Once it has finished curing, remove the cure mixture. I usually put it under cold running water d: Pat it down with paper towels so that it’s dry. It sure looks delectable at this point.

Almost finally: Preparations for smoking – Get a disposable foil roasting pan, and put a layer of wood-pixie-dust in the bottom (I got a bag of manuka-pixie-dust from the supermarket a while back..) It doesn’t need to be super-deep. Put the salmon on to a wire rack (like a *cough*uncoated cake cooling rack*cough*); then put the rack on the roasting pan (I have a rack which is longer than the roasting pan so that it’s nicely supported, about 4cm above the woodchips). Then build a tent to loosely cover the salmon from more tin foil (Another foil roasting pan, upside-down would probably work pretty well too).

Finally: Smoking – put the roasting pan on the barbecue for 15 minutes.

“The Thing with Tofu”

We had a thing with tofu for dinner tonight! It involved…
1 package of firm tofu, 1 capsicum, 1 red onion, 6 button mushrooms, a small handful of sugar snap peas, most of a bunch of silverbeet, and teriyaki sauce (Equal parts mirin, soy sauce and brown sugar).

The tofu was sliced, wrapped in paper towels, and squished for about 40 minutes. Then diced and marinated in the teriyaki sauce until the rest of the veges were prepped.
The capsicum, onion and mushrooms were sliced thinly; and the sugar snap peas and the silverbeet were chopped a little more chunky.
I heated a wide pan with a coating of peanut oil; and browned off the tofu. Next, the capsicum and onion were added until mostly done. At this point, the remaining teriyaki sauce was added to the pan. Next, add the mushrooms and sugar snap peas; and when those are almost done, add the silverbeet and continue cooking until just wilted.

And that’s it (:

Green Thai Fish Curry

But first, what we had for dinner!

It was just a simple ol’ green Thai fish curry with rice. It was made as follows (serves 2): Put three handfuls of rice into a medium pot. Cover by a finger-joint depth of hot tap water. Put on the stove on high.
Take a wide frypan, and add about a teaspoon of peanut oil. Put on medium-high heat. Once it has warmed up; add a heaped teaspoon of green curry paste. Stir it around to distribute.
Chop up two smallish fillets of fish (Terakihi in our case) into biggish chunks, and add to the curry paste. Once the fish has browned off a little, add a small can of coconut cream; and simmer gently until the rice finishes cooking, adding additional water if required. Pile rice into bowls, and top off with curry.

Mmm. Yummy and delicious!