The plan for tonight…

…is to make Fritatta.

Which barely has a recipe.

The fridge, has the last of the left over pork from the roti de porc au lait that I made on Saturday. The pantry cupboard has potatoes, onions, garlic and scallions; along with eggs. Ergo, fritatta seems like a good way to go.

So, about that pork

Hmm. I’m not so sure about it.

It ended up kind of splitting; so I ended up straining the braising liquid and making a thin caramelish sauce. I have a feeling that if I had an immersion blender it might have come right.

The pork ended up extremely delicate though.

Mise En Place

This is some of the prep done for making dinner tonight (and tomorrow night. Probably the night after that, too). We made a pot of beef stew.

We took about 1 kilo of topside beef, which was diced; then tossed in a combination of flour and paprika to lightly coat. Once coated, the beef was browned in batches, then set aside.

Next, 1 red onion, 1 white onion, about five cloves of garlic and a capsicum (bell pepper) were diced, then sauted in the pan the beef was in. Once the vegetables were nice an translucent; I added a couple of splashes of chicken stock to deglaze the bottom of the casserole dish (to get the delicious bits from cooking the beef). Return the beef to the casserole dish, along with two diced potatoes, and add a combination of chicken stock and water so there is enough liquid to reach most the way up the solid ingredients.

Every half hour or so, give the stew a bit of a stir. After about two hours, add six sliced flat mushrooms. Another half hour later, add about three “leaves” of silverbeet which have been shredded. Another half hour later, the stew will be fabulous!

Salmon on Rice

Alas, sometimes when I take photos of a meal; they don’t come out at all well. This evening was one of those times.

In any case, Salmon on Rice was for dinner.

Rice was black sticky rice which was boiled, and finished with butter. Traditionally, black sticky rice is used for making desserts; however, I’m rather fond of its sweet flavour, and the colour of it is fantastic from a presentation perspective.

Salmon was coated in pesto, and baked for the most part; with a brief grill to brown the pesto (baking turned it a tad sludgy. Grilling it, crisped it up nicely).

Imagine, if you would, a white plate with a circle of black-ish burdgandy rice; with a long, narrow, piece of salmon lying demurely across the center of the plate, skin side up.

Roast Vegetables

Carrots, potatoes, parsnips, mushrooms and capsicum roasted together.

Potatoes and parsnip go in first; carrots 15 minutes later; mushrooms another five minutes; then capsicum five minutes later. After another ten to fifteen minutes, roast veges are go!

Lemony Fusion

I wasn’t so fond of how this turned out; so I doubt that I will make it again.

It’s diced chicken, stirfried with a handful of mushrooms; and noodles. The liquid I used for the noodles was one tablespoon each of lemoncello and lemon vincotto. The resulting flavour was quite bitter.

No matter. Next time I’ll try something different!

A dish with rabbit; with a terrible name.

I have been thinking about the sorts of things I might cook over Easter weekend, and rabbit is something that seemed just perfect, in a perverse sort of way (don’t hit me!). I had a poke around some recipe books to see what I could see; and nothing I saw was compelling.

I thought some more. Stroked my chin; and pondered. Then it struck me: I could prepare rabbit loins using a tried and true method that I devised for chicken!

Bunny in MarinadeFirst: Create a marinade using a combination of verjus and honey with salt, and marinate the loins for an hour or so, stirring occasionally. I used two heaped teaspoons of honey and about 1/4 c of verjus making this dish for two people; but by all means vary this as you see fit.

Brown the BunnySecond: After the loins have finished marinading, heat up a cast iron fry pan. Once the pan is hot, take each of the loins out of the marinade, and place in the pan. Hold on to the rest of the marinade! Brown each of the loins.

Glaze the BunnyThen: Once all of the loins are nice and brown; and the honey is starting to caramelise, add the rest of the marinade back into the pan, and continue to cook until the marinade is all caramelised and the rabbit is coated in a delicious sticky glaze.

That, is all there is to it.
Eat the Bunny!

Of course, every dish needs a name. With this dish, however, the name came first. This, will be forever known as….

Honey Bunny.

Morepork

(Nothing to do with the owl)

Monday night, involved roast pork. Since there are only two of us, that means Tuesday night, Wednesday night, and by the looks of it, Thursday night also involve roast pork.

Tuesday night was roast pork sandwiches. Delicious, but hardly worthy of making a blog post about it.

Tonight, though, we had stirfry.

First up, make “delicious liquid #94” (Okay, so 94 is a somewhat arbitary number. Don’t ask me what the preceding 93 delicious liquids are.): So called delicious liquid #94 involves combining about a tablespoon each of soy sauce, golden syrup and mirin (It’s Japanese, sweet, white, rice wine) and mixing everything together.

Next, chop some stuff up! For the two of us, that was about two handfuls of roughly diced roast pork; Eight mushrooms sliced, and two bunches of pak choy (I used one. Two was the correct number, it turns out).

Finally: Fire! Heat up a wok with a little oil, and toss in the pork. Cook until it browns up. Next up, the mushrooms go in. When the mushrooms are starting to brown, add about 1/3 of delicious liquid and continue cooking until the liquid has evaporated off. Add another third, and evaporate again. Add the final third of delicious liquid #94, and add the pak choy. Continue to cook until the pak choy has wilted.

Unfortunately, this smelled so delicious I forgot to take a photo. Oh Noes!