Boeuf Bourguignon

This is boeuf bourguignon, made using the recipe in the Les Halles cookbook; give or take. This is my second attempt at this, and both times it’s ended up with the liquid closer to brown than red. One of these days, I’ll figure out where I’m going wrong.

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Mise En Place

This is some of the prep done for making dinner tonight (and tomorrow night. Probably the night after that, too). We made a pot of beef stew.

We took about 1 kilo of topside beef, which was diced; then tossed in a combination of flour and paprika to lightly coat. Once coated, the beef was browned in batches, then set aside.

Next, 1 red onion, 1 white onion, about five cloves of garlic and a capsicum (bell pepper) were diced, then sauted in the pan the beef was in. Once the vegetables were nice an translucent; I added a couple of splashes of chicken stock to deglaze the bottom of the casserole dish (to get the delicious bits from cooking the beef). Return the beef to the casserole dish, along with two diced potatoes, and add a combination of chicken stock and water so there is enough liquid to reach most the way up the solid ingredients.

Every half hour or so, give the stew a bit of a stir. After about two hours, add six sliced flat mushrooms. Another half hour later, add about three “leaves” of silverbeet which have been shredded. Another half hour later, the stew will be fabulous!

Beef Stir-Fry

– Marinate thinly sliced beef in a mixture of about 1 tablespoon of honey, 1 tablespoon of soy sauce, a teaspoon of crushed garlic; a generous pinch of salt, and pepper for as long as you can bear.

– Slice up 3 spring onions quite small

– Chop the chunky stems off a bunch of pak choy; and cut the bigger leaves in half.

– (Here’s where most of the waiting for as long as you can bear takes place…)

– Heat up a wok with a bit of oil; then add the beef (leaving as much of the marinade behind as possible. The idea here is to brown the meat, not stew it.)

– When the beef has mostly browned; add the spring onions.

– Once the spring onions have wilted; toss in a package of noodles. I used hokkien this time; other times, I use singapore noodles.

– Once the noodles have had a minute or so to cook; add the pak choy, and the remaining marinade; and keep eveything moving until the pak choy has wilted, but is still a little crispy.

– Bowl. Eat.