Ducky!

Roast Duck with Pomegranate Molasses (and rice pilaf).

This was delicious the first time around, when we made it last night; and the leftovers were just as good tonight. Instead of making a rice pilaf, however, we used the rendered duck fat to roast potatoes, kumara and mushrooms that turned out fabulous.

Roast Vegetables

Carrots, potatoes, parsnips, mushrooms and capsicum roasted together.

Potatoes and parsnip go in first; carrots 15 minutes later; mushrooms another five minutes; then capsicum five minutes later. After another ten to fifteen minutes, roast veges are go!

A dish with rabbit; with a terrible name.

I have been thinking about the sorts of things I might cook over Easter weekend, and rabbit is something that seemed just perfect, in a perverse sort of way (don’t hit me!). I had a poke around some recipe books to see what I could see; and nothing I saw was compelling.

I thought some more. Stroked my chin; and pondered. Then it struck me: I could prepare rabbit loins using a tried and true method that I devised for chicken!

Bunny in MarinadeFirst: Create a marinade using a combination of verjus and honey with salt, and marinate the loins for an hour or so, stirring occasionally. I used two heaped teaspoons of honey and about 1/4 c of verjus making this dish for two people; but by all means vary this as you see fit.

Brown the BunnySecond: After the loins have finished marinading, heat up a cast iron fry pan. Once the pan is hot, take each of the loins out of the marinade, and place in the pan. Hold on to the rest of the marinade! Brown each of the loins.

Glaze the BunnyThen: Once all of the loins are nice and brown; and the honey is starting to caramelise, add the rest of the marinade back into the pan, and continue to cook until the marinade is all caramelised and the rabbit is coated in a delicious sticky glaze.

That, is all there is to it.
Eat the Bunny!

Of course, every dish needs a name. With this dish, however, the name came first. This, will be forever known as….

Honey Bunny.

Morepork

(Nothing to do with the owl)

Monday night, involved roast pork. Since there are only two of us, that means Tuesday night, Wednesday night, and by the looks of it, Thursday night also involve roast pork.

Tuesday night was roast pork sandwiches. Delicious, but hardly worthy of making a blog post about it.

Tonight, though, we had stirfry.

First up, make “delicious liquid #94” (Okay, so 94 is a somewhat arbitary number. Don’t ask me what the preceding 93 delicious liquids are.): So called delicious liquid #94 involves combining about a tablespoon each of soy sauce, golden syrup and mirin (It’s Japanese, sweet, white, rice wine) and mixing everything together.

Next, chop some stuff up! For the two of us, that was about two handfuls of roughly diced roast pork; Eight mushrooms sliced, and two bunches of pak choy (I used one. Two was the correct number, it turns out).

Finally: Fire! Heat up a wok with a little oil, and toss in the pork. Cook until it browns up. Next up, the mushrooms go in. When the mushrooms are starting to brown, add about 1/3 of delicious liquid and continue cooking until the liquid has evaporated off. Add another third, and evaporate again. Add the final third of delicious liquid #94, and add the pak choy. Continue to cook until the pak choy has wilted.

Unfortunately, this smelled so delicious I forgot to take a photo. Oh Noes!

Asparagus Risotto

This is just a fairly standard sort of risotto. I trimmed the asparagus tips off for garnishing, and chopped the stems thinly. I finely chopped the zest of a lemon, and set aside the lemon juice for deglazing. As an underlying flavour base, I used 4-5 shallots diced finely.

I blanched the asparagus stems in water, and once they were finished; cooled the water down with a block of frozen chicken stock from the freezer.

In the main pan, I heated some garlic infused olive oil; and added the lemon zest. Once that was fragrant, I added the shallots. When the shallots softened, I added four small handfulls of risotto rice to the pan; which I gently fried until it started to get a little colour. At this stage, I deglazed the pan with the lemon juice. Once the lemon juice evaporated, I started to incorporate the chicken stock. When the risotto was about half complete; I added the asparagus stems to the pan, and moved the asparagus tips into the stock to warm through.

Once the risotto finished; I put it into a couple of bowls, and topped it with freshly grated parmesan and the asparagus tips.

Next time around, I’m going to pass on blanching the asparagus – the idea behind that was to get some asparagus flavour into the chicken stock. It didn’t make that much difference flavourwise, and it was a bit brutal texture-wise.