Roast Vegetables

Carrots, potatoes, parsnips, mushrooms and capsicum roasted together.

Potatoes and parsnip go in first; carrots 15 minutes later; mushrooms another five minutes; then capsicum five minutes later. After another ten to fifteen minutes, roast veges are go!

Caramel Cream

Sometimes, mistakes happen. Sometimes, mistakes are salvageable!

I had whipped cream (about 150ml, thereof); and made some caramel (enough sugar to just cover the bottom of a small pan, covered in water; heated gently until a medium-dark caramel formed).

The theory, was I’d whip the liquid caramel into the cream; and something delicious would result! I was hoping for thin strands of caramel.

Turns out, the caramel liquified the cream; and the cream refused to be whipped back up.

Fear not!

Luckilly, cream comes in 300ml bottles; and I had the rest of the bottle. So, I whipped the remaining cream, then introduced the liquified-caramel-failure slowly; and I ended up with a mousse like dessert treat. Hoorah!

It ended up being quite bittersweet; tasting a little bit coffee-like.

Lemony Fusion

I wasn’t so fond of how this turned out; so I doubt that I will make it again.

It’s diced chicken, stirfried with a handful of mushrooms; and noodles. The liquid I used for the noodles was one tablespoon each of lemoncello and lemon vincotto. The resulting flavour was quite bitter.

No matter. Next time I’ll try something different!

“Without music, life would be a mistake”

We just got back from seeing the Kronos Quartet play at the Wellington Town Hall.

It was really good.

Among other things, it turns out that row E (where we were) is not the fifth row back from the front; and that rows A, B and C didn’t exist, putting us in the second row. The second row was close enough to notice subtle things like the tapping of toes, stray hairs on bows, and the sound of turning music pages.

Potassium, composed by Michael Gordon would have to be my new favourite song.

A dish with rabbit; with a terrible name.

I have been thinking about the sorts of things I might cook over Easter weekend, and rabbit is something that seemed just perfect, in a perverse sort of way (don’t hit me!). I had a poke around some recipe books to see what I could see; and nothing I saw was compelling.

I thought some more. Stroked my chin; and pondered. Then it struck me: I could prepare rabbit loins using a tried and true method that I devised for chicken!

Bunny in MarinadeFirst: Create a marinade using a combination of verjus and honey with salt, and marinate the loins for an hour or so, stirring occasionally. I used two heaped teaspoons of honey and about 1/4 c of verjus making this dish for two people; but by all means vary this as you see fit.

Brown the BunnySecond: After the loins have finished marinading, heat up a cast iron fry pan. Once the pan is hot, take each of the loins out of the marinade, and place in the pan. Hold on to the rest of the marinade! Brown each of the loins.

Glaze the BunnyThen: Once all of the loins are nice and brown; and the honey is starting to caramelise, add the rest of the marinade back into the pan, and continue to cook until the marinade is all caramelised and the rabbit is coated in a delicious sticky glaze.

That, is all there is to it.
Eat the Bunny!

Of course, every dish needs a name. With this dish, however, the name came first. This, will be forever known as….

Honey Bunny.